5 traits of a bad Language School

giphy

 

We’ve all been there, underappreciated, overworked, badly managed, lions being lead by sheep. It can be dreadful on the mind but here are some of the truly worst traits that a Language School can possess, If you see any of them… RUN!

Continue reading “5 traits of a bad Language School”

Advertisements

World Teachers’ day and fond farewells

43087787_253458218696912_8724718529833598976_n

Happy world teachers’ day to all who read this post!

It was a sad start to my world teachers’ day as my two favourite students were leaving. I didn’t think I could connect so much with elementary students: I didn’t know what we’d talk about and how we could even build a relationship, but we did, and I will miss them. They reminded me how rewarding it can be to teach elementary students and the interesting challenges that you face everyday. They’d been with me for only six weeks but it felt like just a few days. I wish they’d stayed longer but it is a very sad part of our jobs that the best and closest students all have to leave at some point. It was a sad morning and made me almost forget about world teachers’ day.

Continue reading “World Teachers’ day and fond farewells”

Blogging in the classroom

giphy

We’ve been blogging for a while now; we’ve had ups and downs, but overall really enjoyed the journey. The interaction with like-minded people, the trolls, the constructive feedback, and the friends, it has all been a blast. We wanted our students to experience a similar thrill, minus the trolls, so we set about setting up a blog for them.

Continue reading “Blogging in the classroom”

Help your students write with ‘write and improve’

giphy

We moved back from Spain last year to England, and when we landed we were fresh out of ideas, but we settled down to a new job in Oxford, and have come across a fantastic website, that we have found very useful for students.

https://writeandimprove.com/ is a really useful tool for helping students with their writing both in and out of the classroom:

Continue reading “Help your students write with ‘write and improve’”

Conversation classes 101

giphy5

Before I came to Spain I only had a vague knowledge of conversation classes and it was not a point that was really focussed on during my CELTA. However after arriving in Spain i soon realised how popular they were and all the problems that can come with this interesting concept of solely speaking for an entire lesson.

I’m not entirely sure where this idea of everyone must have a conversation class comes from , as improvement in all areas of language is valuable and as the skills are interlinked it seems in my opinion quite strange to focus and be obsessed only with one. I can’t see a conversation class being effective for anyone under B2 level (free to disagree). Below this level, speaking can be incorporated into any lesson and specific focus on pronunciation and fluency can also be done here. For higher levels a conversation has the benefit of focussing purely on speaking for the whole class time and within that you can focus on very specific student speaking problem1s or the more wider overall fluency and it gives students enough time to switch their minds into English mode and really test what they know and how they can express themselves.

Either way, in Spain (and most of Europe) you will be asked to do them so here are some pointers that might help you. Some are common sense and some might just make the difference between a successful class and unsuccessful one. Continue reading “Conversation classes 101”

5 things pupils ask that you wish they wouldn’t

giphy3

Welcome to students say the darndest things or should I say any EFL class anywhere. It can be a hoot and a holler teaching them to an outright existential crisis causing nightmare. Here are some of the more humorous episodes that we’ve experienced, perhaps you can relate and add some more in the comments. Continue reading “5 things pupils ask that you wish they wouldn’t”

5 things not to ask an EFL teacher

giphy2

Strange questions are abound in our field so we thought we’d add to the list of peculiar inquisitions we put up with in our most humble of fields.

1.Are you a native?/ You speak very well for a non-native.

Guess what people, not everyone is a native speaker, judge me on my qualifications and experience not my passport. Yes yes ‘student preference’… ‘ EU discrimination’ and so the wheel turns but it is infuriating and inevitability followed with “wow your English is good for a non-native”. Well no shit Sherlock I’ve been studying it for 20 years.

Continue reading “5 things not to ask an EFL teacher”