Tips for the new academic year!

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The summer is ending (unfortunately) and it is time for many new teachers to go abroad and experience their first proper post CELTA job and a time for many returning teachers to get back into the teaching zone. Here are some tips, collected from several teachers, about how to start the new academic year, some are obvious, and maybe some will be very helpful indeed.

Continue reading “Tips for the new academic year!”

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Why you should visit my little Yorkshire town, Hebden Bridge.

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Nestled in a valley between Manchester and Leeds, along the tight and windy A646 lies Hebden Bridge, where old terrace houses belch peat fumes into the winter air, and on summer days young children dive into pools of iron rich, browny orange water, beneath cascading waterfalls, before heading home for tea.

Many people ‘know’ Hebden Bridge, perhaps they drove through it or went on a school trip there once or even heard of it in the newspaper for its diverse sexual demographics  but few get under the surface and experience all this town has to offer. So here are some things to do when you visit Hebden Bridge and some reasons why I love the town so much. Continue reading “Why you should visit my little Yorkshire town, Hebden Bridge.”

A day at a Summer School in England

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Working in a Summer School happened to me through a random job application, whilst unhappy with my job in Spain. I applied; I left it and I didn’t think anything of it, but what I didn’t realise was that the 8 weeks I do every year would serve as the best teaching environment and experience I would have as a teacher, despite being in Spain for 3 years.

Not only was I being paid over the summer, which for many teachers is a dream, I got to do so in the city I went to University and where most of my formative years occurred. I could choose either 15 hr weeks or 30 hr weeks and I had a say in what levels I was interested in teaching, so as to help with my career development, something the school takes seriously, and although only an 8 week contract, I honestly felt a better teacher for it and that my skills had actually developed. I learnt a lot of new activities to use in the classroom and I actually got to use my CELTA knowledge.

To give a better idea of my experience and hopefully many others, here is what I did on a typical day in a typical 30hr week: Continue reading “A day at a Summer School in England”

5 things to do in Canterbury, England

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Canterbury is a contradictive city: Medieval buildings preserved for posterity and modern, ever encroaching university buildings march forward to take the town, in the name of Christ Church.

It seems the only arbitrator is the old Norman wall, barely holding them apart, and struggling under the load of tourists crippling its back. The cathedral stands proud looking on, at what its fair city has become, and although still standing tall, it can’t help but shudder and watch as a few more tiles fall off its ageing face as tourists’ pennies fail to provide it with the life it once knew.

I love this city; I fear for this city but most all I want you to enjoy the beauty of this city before more medieval buildings become chain coffee shops and before the eternally shining cathedral dims ever so slightly.

Here are my 5 things to do in Canterbury (and it was hard to choose 5!) if you ever happen to find yourself in the garden of England’s heart. Continue reading “5 things to do in Canterbury, England”

Teruel- Mudejar and a little Bull

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Rushing through the bare Aragonese countryside, our train desperately trying to outrun a summer storm chasing us across the plateau, we have time to reflect on our 8 months in Logroño and time to plan for our final week in Spain a trip from Logroño to Teruel to Valencia then Madrid and finally home. Continue reading “Teruel- Mudejar and a little Bull”

Logroño- Where the wine flows freely

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El Rio Ebro slowly meanders round this pretty little city, flowing as smoothly as the wine it helps to produce. What Logroño lacks in size it makes up for in curiosity as narrow streets and parks await exploration by anyone who stays the night. The capital of the smallest autonomous community in Spain, La Rioja, it is also the capital of wine and tapas whilst acting as a beacon for weary pilgrims, making their way along El Camino; their destination Santiago de Compostela.

Continue reading “Logroño- Where the wine flows freely”